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Ford Tri-motor: books - history, models and technology

A book on the Ford Tri-motor? Here are illustrated books on the history, models and technology of Ford passenger aircraft.

The Ford Tri-motor, 1926-1992

A large number of people in the United States had their first airplane ride in a Ford Tri-Motor during the 1920s and 1930s, a plane that remains to this day a fine example of engineering, planning and production. It was the application of a modified assembly line production by the world's largest automobile manufacturer to a continuously refined design, backed by extensive advertising and publicity concerned with safety, at a time when such dependability and safety was crucial, that put Ford ahead of all of its competitors.
The all-metal construction, stressed so much by the Ford advertising campaign of the late 1920s, proved its worth in later years. The life span of the average airplane in the 1920s was relatively short and so it is not surprising to find the Ford Company timidly stating in their 1929 advertising that "no Ford plane has yet worn out in service."

This book by aviation historian William T. Larkins is the most complete information available on the Ford Tri-Motor, and includes information on design, contruction, model designations, a cross-indexing of U.S. and foreign registrations, a cross-index to military Ford Tri-Motors, accident summaries, Ford factory employees and Ford Tri-Motor pilot listing.

Author:William T. Larkins
Specs:320 pages, 28 x 21.5 x 3.2 cm / 11 x 8.5 x 1.26 in, hardback
Illustrations:over 520 b&w photographs
Publisher:Schiffer Publishing Ltd (USA, 2004)
Book: The Ford Tri-motor, 1926-1992

The Ford Tri-motor, 1926-1992

Language: English

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The Saga of the Tin Goose - The Story of the Ford Tri-Motor (3rd Edition)

It was the brainchild of Henry Ford and inventor William Bushnell Stout. It was the Ford Tri Motor, affectionately called the Tin Goose, the first all-metal passenger plane built in the United States.
Only one hundred ninety-nine were ever manufactured, but they launched regular scheduled flights in America, introducing almost everything we have in air travel today - from stewardesses to concrete runways in airports.

All major airlines started with this plane. Byrd flew to the South Pole in one. FDR dreamed up the New Deal flying in another to the Chicago convention where he was nominated for president.
In a Ford Tri-Motor, Lindbergh inaugurated the first transcontinental air service. And when speedier Boeings and Douglases pushed the Ford Tri-Motor off the major air routes, the Tin Goose kept flying commercially for another fifty years, barnstorming from city to city giving hundreds of thousands of Americans their first plane ride, dusting crops and fire-fighting in the Midwest, and hauling freight and passengers into remote Central American jungles and over the Andes.

This revised and updated edition of "The Saga of the Tin Goose" relates the story of this remarkable plane from its 1920s beginnings to the present, and tells where you can see and fly Ford Tri-Motors today.

Author:David A Weiss
Specs:302 pages, 23 x 15 x 1.6 cm / 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.63 in, paperback
Illustrations:b&w photographs
Publisher:Trafford Publications (USA, 2012)
Book: The Saga of the Tin Goose - The Story of the Ford Tri-Motor (3rd Edition)

The Saga of the Tin Goose - The Story of the Ford Tri-Motor (3rd Edition)

Language: English

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Instruction Manual for Ford Trimotor Airplane

First produced in 1925, the Ford Trimotor had an immediate impact on commercial aviation, enabling Transcontinental Air Transport to launch coast-to-coast service in the USA and helping Pan American Airways expand into Central and South America.
Developed by William B. Stout, whose Stout Metal Airplane Company was acquired by Ford Motor Co. in 1924, the aircraft had three Wright radial engines and boasted all-metal construction. It could fly in both passenger and cargo configurations and was, for its time, both reliable and rugged.
Its capacity however was limited, with Rapid advances in aviation led to the curtailment of production in 1933. By then 199 "Tin Gooses" had been produced. They would go on to fly with over 100 airlines worldwide, and in the service of the U.S. military and other air forces.

Originally entitled "Suggestions on the Operation of the Ford Trimotor", this flight manual dates to 1926. It provides a fascinating look inside the cockpit of one of history's most iconic aircraft.

Author:Stout Metal Aircraft Co.
Specs:116 pages, 23 x 15.5 cm / 9.1 x 6.1 in, paperback
Illustrations:numerous photographs and drawings
Publisher:Periscope Film (USA, 2013)
Book: Instruction Manual for Ford Trimotor Airplane

Instruction Manual for Ford Trimotor Airplane

Language: English

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Last update:20-04-2024